Hi, I'm Shel
Archive
Disclosure

April 21, 2017

Skill level: BEGINNER

Bear 🐻 making — it's happening. Pro tip: These wee fingertip brushes make clearing mohair from seams a breeze. They're called "nap riser" brushes, and you can find them in the "Teddy bear making • GOODS" section of my Amazon Associates store by clicking right here.

About my tutorials
These "trade-secret" tips & tricks are original and posted just for you. Pins, links, and shares warmly welcomed! You're free to sell what grows from viewing these tutorials. Please don't repost or reprint them, though, or claim them as your own. Your respect and understanding are appreciated. Happy creating!

March 18, 2013

Skill level: INTERMEDIATE

After 10 years as a creative professional, I've learned efficiency in bear making. I've also learned that for a quality result, some things just can't be rushed -- like foot pads. Taking time to "Trace & Baste" each pad, every time, makes every outcome near perfect.

Here's my method for attaching foot pads:
 

  • Trace a 1/4" seam allowance onto the wrong side of each pad with a white gel pen

  • Fold pads in half length-wise, wrong sides together

  • Mark center top and center bottom of each pad with white gel pen

  • Match center top of each pad to leg seam at toe. Stitch to secure.

  • Match center bottom of each pad to leg seam at heel. Stitch to secure.

  • Baste foot pad to foot opening along outer edge

  • Machine-stitch foot pad to leg, following white stitching lines

  • (Optionally, remove basting stitches)


About my tutorials

These "trade-secret" tips & tricks are original and posted just for you. Pins, links, and shares warmly welcome...

March 13, 2013

Skill level: BEGINNER

A white gel pen works great for tracing pattern pieces onto mohair with dark backing. Gel ink is opaque and liquid, flowing readily over nubby woven fabrics. There's no bleeding, no show through, no mess. 

Thus ends the shortest tutorial ever. Still helpful, though, right? :)

About my tutorials
These "trade-secret" tips & tricks are original and posted just for you. Pins, links, and shares warmly welcomed! You're free to sell what grows from viewing these tutorials. Please don't repost or reprint them, though, or claim them as your own. Your respect and understanding are appreciated. Happy creating!

March 10, 2013

Skill level: BEGINNER 

Kool Aid is GREAT for dyeing mohair. It's easy to afford, easy to find, easy to store, and easy to work with. Be sure to wear rubber gloves, though, because it's ALSO easy to dye your hands with. Not that I know anything about that. Ahem.

Kool Aid is ready-to-dye straight from the packet because it already contains citric acid, which helps color bond. As a protein (acid) dye, Kool Aid will readily tint animal fibers like mohair, alpaca, and wool. Plant (cellulose) fibers like cotton or linen will dye with Kool Aid too, but to a much lesser degree. So don't use Kool Aid to target-dye just the mohair backing and NOT the hairs; to achieve that result, choose a dye meant for the plant fibers that make up the backing.


Kool Aid is a non-toxic, forgiving dye method, and the irregularities of mohair plush forgive any dye inconsistencies even further. So relax and have fun with it! 

HOW TO MIX AND STORE DYE:

 

  • Pour the c...

March 7, 2013

Skill level: ADVANCED

It might surprise you to learn that making bears that can stand is a lot of work! I tend to prefer the slouchy siting look for my teds -- they seem somehow "cozier" that way to me, and I like my bears to have a comforting, cozy feel -- so I don't make standing bears very often. When I do, though, some or all of the following tips really help. Maybe they can help you, too!​
 

  • When designing your pattern, make the feet a little bigger than usual, and keep the pawpads kinda "fat."

  • Skip cotter pins and instead use bolts & locknuts to joint the hips. Make 'em tight!

  • Create an armature to stabilize the legs. Here's how: 
     

    1. Thread a bolt through the center hole of a "ring terminal" before poking it through the center hole of your disk. 

    2. Insert cut end of thick, plastic-coated wire into the ring terminal sleeve and crimp sleeve closed hard, using pliers. 

    3. Shape wire, bringing it down through thigh and calf, bending at the a...

March 6, 2013

 
Skill level: BEGINNER

A mason jar (weighted with bb's) makes an affordable and very stable stand for a head in progress. It's easier, I think, to place ears well when you can view the head at arm's length.

Set the round center of the lid aside for another/later use, but keep the metal rim attached. It protects the glass edge, preventing chips.

About my tutorials
These "trade-secret" tips & tricks are original and posted just for you. Pins, links, and shares warmly welcomed! You're free to sell what grows from viewing these tutorials. Please don't repost or reprint them, though, or claim them as your own. Your respect and understanding are appreciated. Happy creating!

September 22, 2012

Skill level: BEGINNER 

SPOOK's neck ruff is made from a single layer of plaid which looks finished on both sides. It frayed into a pretty fringe when a few edge threads were pulled. If your fabric has a definite "right" and "wrong" side or you want a finished edge you need a backing layer. In that case, as your first step, cut two fabric strips instead of one. Sew those strips (right sides facing) around all four sides, leaving an opening. Turn right side out and stitch the opening closed. You can then follow directions as shown. Easy peasy!

About my tutorials
These "trade-secret" tips & tricks are original and posted just for you. Pins, links, and shares warmly welcomed! You're free to sell what grows from viewing these tutorials. Please don't repost or reprint them, though, or claim them as your own. Your respect and understanding are appreciated. Happy creating!

Please reload

I love sewing, soaping,
nature, reading, people, birds, Disney, coffee, & fleece
blog

Musings and messes and magic and fun... the happy scrapbook of a creative, grateful life.

Sometimes I link to resources that I use personally and thus feel comfortable recommending to others. I participate in the Amazon Associates program, so when you purchase using my links I may receive a small percentage of the sale (at no additional cost to you.) Thank you for helping support indie artisans!  I will only recommend what I know and believe in; never just to be compensated. So when I write that I use and love something, you can trust that I really do.

Please reload

Tags
feeling social?

All content unless otherwise noted

© 2018 Shelli Quinn | Shelli Makes Studio

*Not affiliated with Disney/Pixar